Counterfeit Alli Weight Loss Drug Dangerous

alli comparison

Do you remember hearing about the FDA granting approval to Alli, the weight loss drug? I remember seeing tons and tons of commercials and so many people were excited because there was finally a http://answers.usa.gov/cgi-bin/gsa_ict.cfg/php/enduser/std_adp.php?p_faqid=6855&p_created=1129217868&p_sid=2-2LapSj&p_accessibility=0&p_redirect=&p_lva=&p_sp=cF9zcmNoPTEmcF9zb3J0X2J5PSZwX2dyaWRzb3J0PSZwX3Jvd19jbnQ9MTI5LDEyOSZwX3Byb2RzPTAmcF9jYXRzPSZwX3B2PSZwX2N2PSZwX3BhZ2U9MSZwX3NlYXJjaF90ZXh0PXdlaWdodCBsb3Nz&p_li=&p_topview=1 drug that had federal approval.

But earlier this week the FDA warned people that a http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm197857.htm was out there and that it could be really dangerous.

There are a couple key differences that you can look for in the products to spot if you may have a fake:
If your expiration date has a month, day and year, it’s fake. Real Alli only uses month and year.
If your bottle has a plain foil safety seal it’s a fake. Real Alli has the words “SEALED for YOUR PROTECTION” printed on it.

The fake bottle is also taller and wider than the authentic one.

So far it looks like the fake Alli has only been sold online, not in retail stores, but if you use Alli, you want to make sure to check your bottle closely.

Have you ever used weight loss products to help you slim down? Were they ever recalled?

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